The Lemonade Project Session 2


Birthing Ourselves:

Identity / Formation / Memory / History

Join MODA as we begin deconstructing identity in order to understand its direct link to memory and history as presented in he most recent work of Beyonce Knowles Carter and her sister Solange Knowles.

From birth to adulthood, our identities are informed by those to whom are closest — our families and surrounding communities — as well as by the society and culture in which we live. In this session, we’ll facilitate a discussion of the pain and privilege associated with identity by collaboratively examining Beyoncé’s Lemonade and Solange’s A Seat at the Table for themes of identity, memory, and history. What do stories do these albums tell? Do they relate to your own? How can privilege and/or pain affect your voice, and therefore your identity?

Discuss this and more at MODA for “The Lemonade Project”.

About the moderators:

Blair Banks (MODA)

Blair Banks is the Education Coordinator and Manager of Design Club at MODA. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Race and Ethnicity Studies from Salem College in Winston-Salem, NC. Over her four years of study, she enrolled in courses dealing with racial violence, black womanhood, social stratification, and identity, culminating in two senior projects exploring the commodification of the black body in the late 19th and early 20th century, as well as the racialization of Black Seminoles in the South.

Though her studies have focused on the past, she is excited to use current popular culture, like Beyonce’s visual album, Lemonade, and the accompanying Lemonade Syllabus to uncover a trend in themes and experiences within communities of color.

Aretina Hamilton (Lab Atlanta)

Aretina Hamilton is a Cultural Geographer whose research intersects with Race, Gender, and Sexuality. She is PhD  Candidate in Geography at the University of Kentucky, and holds a Certificate in Gender and Women’s Studies from the same university.  Prior to relocating to Atlanta to join the faculty of Lab Atlanta, she was a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of African American Studies at Ohio University. During this time, she taught a course entitled The Black Woman which used Beyonce's discography to teach about race, gender, feminism, and women’s empowerment. In addition to teaching, she has presented research at several academic conferences which have focused on Beyonce’s work as a discourse on Black Feminism.

The Lemonade Project is free to attend because designing for social justice, both personal and communal, is for everyone! Want to fuel this design movement to help inspire positive change in the world? Make a donation of $10 or more in support of museum in all of its efforts to mobilize change by design. Design = Change.

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